Archive for dog training

Discriminating Your Hallway

Posted in Pet Products, Training with tags , , , , , , , on March 23, 2009 by exigentbarker

Picture the situation. You have a room or rooms in your home that you want to keep the dog from getting into. Perhaps there is a room of valuables, sensitive equipment, or a nursery. Getting a pet gate is an excellent way to keep the dog cut off from one area of the home. They are commonly easy to install and have pass-through gates with latches or locks, allowing you to move freely through the designated areas.

Now, suppose you have multiple pets? If you want to keep the dog out of an area but don’t mind the cat being there, this solution presents a problem: how to gate off the dog and let the cat roam free?

The solution: Gates with Pet Doors. These are incredibly useful gates that operate just like most others. Pressure mounted or hardware mounted, preventing your dog from going where you don’t want him. Included in these gates are smaller openings with swing-style doors that allow a much smaller pet access. Cats can roam just as easily as us and you can still keep the dog away.

The uses for this are sure to arise in many situations when you have two pets living together. For example, keep the dog away from the cat’s litter box.

It is not just limited for larger pets, either.

What if you have smaller dogs, and don’t want the hassle of uninstalling or removing a pressure mounted gate every time the dogs want to go outside? Use the locking pet door built into the gate to let them through when desired. These gates commonly feature latches allowing you to do just this.

Keep your dog separate and allow access for other animals. These gated pet doors are the perfect solution.

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Pet Gates Give you Control in your Home

Posted in Pet Products, Training with tags , , , , , , , , on March 6, 2009 by exigentbarker

As a pet owner you have to be prepared for your pet to do things that it is not supposed to do when you are not there to supervise. For the most part your pet seems to act out when you are not home for an extended period of time. After you get done with a long day at work, the last thing you want to come home to is a house looking like it was just hit by a hurricane! Yet you feel bad locking your pet in a closed room for 9 hours a day. What are your options? Simple, you invest in a pet gate.

Pet gates are an excellent way to keep your pet out of those “off limits,” areas and avoid damage to your things while you are gone. They also can be a barrier between your pets and small children if you don’t want your pet and child to interact without your presence. There are many different sizes, heights and install types of pet gates. You can buy free standing, pressure mounted and permanent install pet gates, depending on how you want your gate to operate and what kind of pet you own. Free standing gates are a single solitary unit that requires no installation, they just block the opening or your hallway, doorway or whatever area you are trying to bar. If you are looking to barricade a puppy or small breed dog, a free standing gate may be a commendable choice as a larger dog may be able to knock a free standing gate over. Pressure mounted gates also require no installation with mounting hardware or screwing into adjacent walls, but are still considered a semi-permanent gate as they are secured into place by tension. These gates are great for someone looking to move or relocate the gate with ease, but need a gate sturdy enough for their larger pets. Permanent gates are installed with hardware that mounts on walls or surfaces adjacent to the gate. Permanent gates are the strongest available but do require tools and/or basic “handyman,” knowledge to install. Many gates available are JPMA (Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association) certified and are designed to work as baby gates also. Nothing like killing two birds with one stone!

Many people have difficulties with their dogs destroying things when they are gone no matter how obedient there dog is when they present. In many cases damage is done by accident or clumsiness of your dog and can be completely avoided by taking precautions like installing pet gates.

Gotta Eat That

Posted in Behavior with tags , , , , , on February 21, 2009 by exigentbarker

Does your house look like one giant chew toy, day in and day out? If so, you most likely have tried everything in your power to stop the constant chewing episodes that take place in your home while you are gone. Understanding the reasons for your dogs destructive chewing habits and knowing how to combat these habits can be very beneficial to you as a pet owner, and more importantly to your furniture, clothing, pet door flaps and other possessions of yours that can become chewing targets for your dog. Teething is to be expected in the early stages of your dogs life, but most people don’t realize that the chewing habit will not stop there. When puppies are teething their teeth are very sharp, chewing on things will smooth their teeth so when the permanent teeth come in they will not be so sharp. When the permanent teeth come through they require hard chewing for the new teeth to “set,” into the jaw. This stage is where the heavy chewing can really become an issue. Although this chewing may ruin some of your property, it is very important for your dogs lifelong dental health, and if you are proactive in taking the necessary actions early enough you can often eliminate or at least minimize this destructive chewing of your things. A good way to do this is to make sure that your dog has many different chew toys with a wide variety of textures and sizes to choose from. This variety will hopefully deter your dog from looking for other chewable things around the house like your couch or clothing after they get bored with a certain chew toy. The most effective way to protect your furniture and property is to have a designated safe area for your pet to rest while you are gone. Many pet owners will use pet crates or even put their dog in a room that doesn’t contain any chewable furniture. When leaving your dog alone in room you do not want to close the door on them, instead use a baby gate or two baby gates stacked on top of each other if necessary. Locking your dog in a fully enclosed room can lead to other bad habits such as clawing at the closed door or ripping up carpet under the door frame, which is just another issue for you to deal with.

As a pet owner it is important to understand that you are a human and your dog is a dog. Human logic is much more complex and this must be considered when disciplining your dog. If the dog chews up your couch at noon and you come home at 7 p.m., yelling at your will do no good. Your dog doesn’t have the mental capacity to put a reason behind your displeasure, as it had been seven hours since the destructive chewing occurred. Instead yelling may cause your pet to develop separation anxiety which will make their chewing habit worse.

Destructive chewing is the number one reason that people get rid of their dogs. If you put time and effort in to training and take the necessary actions to fix your dogs destructive chewing habit, you should not have any problems. If your dog is a destructive chewer, be proactive not reactive!